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Issue 567: Eggplant-Coated Breaded Cutlets

Brynie Greisman

Another delicious use for eggplant dip — an instant hit!

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

 Mishpacha-Recipe

Food and prop styling by Janine Kalesis, Photography by Hudi Greenberger

I was talking to my friend Gila one day, and she mentioned an eggplant dip she made that was amazing. I tried it, tweaked it, and loved it. When I had a little leftover, I decided to experiment with chicken cutlets. After all, we coat cutlets with ketchup and mayo, so why not with this dip? It was an instant hit. Make more than you think you’ll need.

INGREDIENTS

Serves 8


Chicken
  • 2 lbs (1 kg) chicken cutlets
  • bread crumbs (see note)

EGGPLANT DIP
  • 2 medium-large eggplants
  • ⅔ cup light mayonnaise
  • 2 medium-large ripe tomatoes, chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 2 pinches sugar



PREPARATION

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). 

Pierce eggplants here and there with a knife or fork (this is to allow steam to escape). Place on a piece of aluminum foil in the oven and bake for 1 hour. If the eggplants aren’t soft, you might want to up the temperature for the last 15 minutes. Remove from oven and cool. 

Meanwhile, in a 1-quart (1-liter) container, place the mayo, tomatoes, garlic, and seasonings. Slice the eggplants in half lengthwise and scoop out the flesh with a spoon. Add to the container and mix with an immersion blender until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. 

For the cutlets: Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Prepare a plate with dip and a plate with bread crumbs. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Spray generously with cooking spray and set aside. Smear a tablespoon of dip or more on each side of the cutlets. Coat with bread crumbs and place on tray. When all the cutlets are finished, cover with another piece of parchment paper and slide into the oven. Bake for approximately 30 minutes. 

Using tongs or a spatula, carefully turn the cutlets over. Return to oven, uncovered, and bake an additional 10 minutes or until crispy.

Note You will have leftover dip. It keeps in the fridge for at least a week, so enjoy it on bread, challah, or crackers, or served alongside fried fish or roasted chicken. It freezes well too. For the bread crumbs, I use leftover challah, baked in the oven until golden and crispy, then pulsed in a food processor until crumbs are formed. This greatly enhances the taste. Store leftover crumbs in the freezer.

Freezing tip: Defrost in the fridge or on the counter and reheat in the oven before serving. You can also freeze raw, breaded, and then bake for an additional 10 minutes.

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Issue 565: Cranberry Chicken With Sweet Potato Fries and Edamame

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