Join The Conversation With Mishpacha's Weekly Newsletter



Issue 425: Sweet Noodle Kugelettes

Brynie Greisman

A lukshen kugel even better than the time-honored classic

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

 Mishpacha-Recipe

Food and prop styling by Amit Farber, Photography by Daniel Lailah

Lukshen kugel is a staple in many homes on Friday night. Why not serve up a healthier version? This came out so good, that as the stylist was popping the kugelettes out of their tins, he popped at least two of them into his mouth. Honestly, it tastes better than the original!

INGREDIENTS

Yields 25 servings


Sweet Noodle Kugelettes
  • 12 oz (340 g) fine or medium noodles (or a combination)
  • 12 oz (340 g) whole wheat spaghetti, broken into pieces
  • 6–8 eggs
  • ¼ cup oil
  • ½ cup applesauce
  • heaping 1/2 cup turbinado sugar
  • 4 packages vanilla sugar
  • 1 Tbsp salt
  • 2 Tbsp wheat germ
  • 2 Tbsp ground almonds
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/4 tsp white pepper
  • 1 ½ tsp cinnamon


PREPARATION

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Cook and drain noodles and spaghetti, but do not rinse. Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl, taking care that everything is very well combined. 

Pour into prepared pans (3 9-inch rounds or 16 mini kugelettes plus 1 9-inch round) and bake as follows: 9-inch rounds for 1 hour and kugelettes for 35–40 minutes, or until golden. Freezes beautifully.

Note: This is based on a recipe in the Bobov cookbook — the original recipe calls for all white noodles, 1/3 cup oil, 1 cup sugar, and 1/4 cup bread crumbs. I subbed part whole wheat pasta (it doesn’t look brown after being cooked and doesn’t taste different here at all), reduced the oil and subbed applesauce (keeps it just as creamy), reduced the sugar, and subbed healthier binders in place of the bread crumbs — wheat germ and ground nuts.

I also upped the cinnamon because I felt it could use it, and used 8 eggs and not 6 as is called for because I felt it necessary for the texture.

Tip Wheat germ and ground nuts should both be kept in the fridge or freezer to enhance shelf life and preserve freshness. Wheat germ can be added to many baked goods, replacing a small part of the flour and adding a lot of nutrition.

Related Stories

Issue 447: Peach-glazed grilled chicken cutlets with watermelon salad

Rivky Kleiman

A stunning way to put summer on a plate

Issue 459: Moroccan-Style Couscous

Estee Kafra

A side dish or a salad, it’s versatile, different… and delicious!

Issue 426: Poached Pears with Spiced Pomegranate Reduction

Estee Kafra

An elegant-but-easy special-event dessert

Share this page with a friend. Fill in the information below, and we'll email your friend a link to this page on your behalf.

Your name
Your email address
You friend's name
Your friend's email address
Please type the characters you see in the image into the box provided.
CAPTCHA
Message


MM217
 
Whose State Is It?
Rabbi Moshe Grylak The Nation-State Bill adds nothing to the simple truth
First, Clean Your Room
Yonoson Rosenblum Disorder of our rooms reflects the disorder of our minds
Start Up with G-d
Eytan Kobre “Women rabbis” suffocate the spirit of the law
The Non-Competitive Competitors
Rabbi Avrohom Weinrib Competition? We are all working for the same Boss!
In Defense of Those Eltere Bochurim
“Still Waiting” (an anonymous contributor) A perspective built on 12 years (and counting) of dating
No Size Fits All
Jacob L. Freedman Meir’s success seemed practically carved out for him
Endnote - Start with the Heart
Riki Goldstein “I start with the heart of the sound, then add layers”
Great Shakes
Rabbi Ron Yitzchok Eisenman Hashem has His ways of pressing our “reset” button
Of Gates and Gators
Faigy Peritzman Our ears can receive messages the most easily
I Don’t Know
Sarah Chana Radcliffe Get around decision paralysis by listening to your gut
Time to Try the Frum Dating Sites?
Sara Eisemann That’s my problem and I’ll have to work it through