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Layered Bulgur Salad

Brynie Greisman

Perfect as a side salad or a stand-alone light meal

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

 Mishpacha-Recipe

FOOD AND PROP STYLING BY JANINE K. ALESIS, PHOTOGRAPHY BY HUDI GREENBERGER

The combo of soft and crunchy textures, together with a light and lemony dressing, make this a very popular choice, either as a salad or a light meal of its own. You can sub quinoa if you like.

INGREDIENTS

Serves 6–8

  • 1 cup bulgur 
  • 2 cups boiling water 
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil or vegetable oil 
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 2 scallions, chopped 
  • 1 cup canned chickpeas
  • 2 generous handfuls fresh parsley, chopped
  •  1 large carrot, julienned
  • 1 tomato, diced 
  • 1/2 avocado, cut into chunks


PREPARATION

Pour boiling water (you can also use broth or stock of your choice) over bulgur in a heatproof bowl. Stir once. Cover and let steep for 15 minutes, or until soft. (Fine bulgur will need 10–15 minutes, medium will need 15–20 minutes, and coarse bulgur will need 20–25.)
Drain excess liquid if necessary.
In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, oil, salt, and pepper. Set aside. Place bulgur in the bottom of a nice glass bowl. (You can use all of it, or leave some for a different time.) Layer vegetables and chickpeas as follows: scallions, carrot, chickpeas, and parsley. Tomato should go around the rim of the bowl, with the avocado in the center.
Pour dressing over salad. Stir immediately before serving. Garnish with extra parsley if desired. Serve at room temperature.

Tip Top with grated feta cheese for a dairy meal.

Note Bulgur (also spelled burgul or bulghur) is dried cracked wheat. It’s made from whole wheat that’s partially boiled and then dried, so it needs no cooking. Use the 1:2 ratio of bulgur to liquid. You may want to toast in fat before hydrating it. It tastes equally good chilled, tepid, or reheated.
Add some bulgur to leafy salads — it’s low in fat, high in fiber, and rich in vitamins and minerals.
Comparing 1 cup of quinoa to 1 cup of bulgur, quinoa has 8 grams of protein, 220 calories, and 5 grams of fiber; bulgur has 6 grams of protein, 150 calories, and 8 grams of fiber. So if you’re dieting, go for bulgur.
If you want to maximize vitamin and mineral intake, go for quinoa.

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