Join The Conversation With Mishpacha's Weekly Newsletter



Our Rebbeim Need Resources

A Concerned Mechanech

Why are girls’ lessons more “colorful” and creative?

Wednesday, September 05, 2018

D

ear Editor,
our publication teaches a lot and brings a lot of important issues to the forefront. I would like to bring up a very important one. The rebbeim and principals we have today are an extremely dedicated group of individuals. They love Torah, they love Hashem, and they love the boys. Almost all of them could be making a good living doing something else, but through tremendous mesirus nefesh, they stay in the field to teach Hashem’s Torah to His children. They are incredibly dedicated and our hats go off to them. 
Perhaps, though, today’s rebbeim are not receiving the support they deserve. Perhaps their hands are figuratively tied behind their backs. Think of a first-year morah. She gets a job and she’s really excited. She might not be making a lot of money, but she got the job despite a huge amount of competition from other talented and dedicated girls who all wanted the same position. Wow. What’s the first thing she does? 
She gets sheets. Sheets on what? Sheets on a myriad of subjects. She is told all the subjects she needs to cover in the three hours daily she has with her students: Chumash, Navi, Yahadus, Parshah, Biur Tefillah, Halachah — the list goes on and on. How in depth each subject will be taught will depend on which grade she teaches, but one thing’s for sure: She’ll be expected to present each lesson in all sorts of creative ways, and she will have endless resources from other teachers to do so. Eighth-grade Chumash? Mefarshim inside. Primary grades? Puppet shows, amazing crafts, and an extremely detailed parshah story book. For Yahadus lessons there will be details of halachos and inspiration before every Yom Tov. 
Navi will be taught in detail with colorful projects. Biur tefillah? Extremely important — teach, drill, scrapbook, repeat. Every subject is creatively presented. Let’s compare that to the dedicated rebbi. He is not pursuing another, better paying job where he could support his family with more comfort. He is intent on teaching tinokos shel beis rabban, inspiring them, becoming like those melamdim who are compared to stars that shine for millennia. All he wants to do is teach. And what is he given? A plain Chumash. 
Does he have equal access to all the incredibly varied resources available for the moros? The sheets, projects, songs, scrapbooks? Is he even expected to teach with such creativity and props? And yet he has to teach five to seven hours every day. Why the difference? Why are the girls’ lessons so much more “colorful” and creative than the boys’? Hoping you will print this letter and bring up this subject in our community. A concerned (originally) out-of-town mechanech (Originally featured in Mishpacha, Issue 726)

Share this page with a friend. Fill in the information below, and we'll email your friend a link to this page on your behalf.

Your name
Your email address
You friend's name
Your friend's email address
Please type the characters you see in the image into the box provided.
CAPTCHA
Message


MM217
 
The Fortunes of War
Rabbi Moshe Grylak We’re still feeling the fallout of the First World War
Some Lessons, But Few Portents
Yonoson Rosenblum What the midterms tell us about 2020
Vote of Confidence
Eyan Kobre Why I tuned in to the liberal radio station
5 out of 10
Rabbi Dovid Bashevkin Top 5 Moments of the Kinus
Day in the Life
Rachel Bachrach Chaim White of KC Kosher Co-op
When Less is More
Rabbi Ron Yitzchok Eisenman How a good edit enhances a manuscript
It’s My Job
Jacob L. Freedman “Will you force me to take meds?”
They’re Still Playing My Song?
Riki Goldstein Yitzy Bald’s Yerav Na
Yisroel Werdyger Can’t Stop Singing
Riki Goldstein Ahrele Samet’s Loi Luni
Double Chords of Hope
Riki Goldstein You never know how far your music can go
Will Dedi Have the Last Laugh?
Dovid N. Golding Dedi and Ding go way back
Battle of the Budge
Faigy Peritzman Using stubbornness to grow in ruchniyus
The Challenging Child
Sarah Chana Radcliffe Strategies for raising the difficult child
Bucking the Trend
Sara Eisemann If I skip sem, will I get a good shidduch?
The Musician: Part 1
D. Himy, M.S. CCC-SLP and Zivia Reischer "If she can't read she'll be handicapped for life!"